Pulitzer prize for feature photography

Renee C Byar's tough but lovely photos of a mother and child. Cyndie French defines hero.
(knocked me right on my ass but that has to be in part because my baby's 10, too.)

Comments

  1. Oh thanks Kate, real cheerful - I'm bawling my eyes out right now, can't see the damn keyboard. What fabulous pictures, and what an amazing mother.
    (and thanks for the link - it is uplifting in a way. Sort of.)

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  2. Yeah, made me sob and I'm not a crier. So why did I post it? Ummm. The powerful uplifting thing, I guess?

    It makes me a lot more willing to play badminton with my 10-year-old.

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  3. Which is why I couldn't possibly work in pediatric oncology.

    How do people do it? Because they have no choice. Oh, there's the occasional father who abandons his family because he can't face the one dying child, but I suspect that's an even harder course to take. Because, how could you live with yourself afterwards?

    What I don't understand is how people like this keep their faith.

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  4. sxKitten10:27 PM

    I think they keep their faith because it's easier to believe your child is suffering for a reason, or that they're going to something better.

    I hope none of us ever have to go through anything like this.

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  5. The children are the most heartbreaking. I couldn't stand to see the 18 year olds in the chemo room with me getting treated for breast cancer. I had to tell my oncologist to book me on a different day. I couldn't stand to see the really old either, clinging to life so desperately. Some days I don't think the cancer was half as bad as what I've seen and the people I've sat in waiting rooms talking to about their suffering. I can't get out of my mind this dying guy that refused to have a port-a-cath put in and yet he kept doing the chemo. It ate part of his wrist area up like acid. He showed me his hand like a swollen bear paw. Then he bounced out of the room after we had a talk about medicinal marijuana. I never saw him again.

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  6. corn dog, did you actually click over and look at the pix? Because I don't know if I would have if I were in your shoes. (Or maybe it's "when" I'll be in them. Yet another friend has been diagnosed with cancer--it almost feels like it's inevidable.)

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  7. I made myself look at all of the pictures. I sat here and cried. I can't stand it that the child suffered so with his swollen belly and blackened eye from the brain tumor. His mother was a brave and wonderful soul. I do think they will find a cure and then the children will be saved first.

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